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Season of migration to the north and heart of darkness african mimicry of european stereotypes

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dc.contributor.author El-Hussari, Ibrahim A.
dc.date.accessioned 2018-02-05T13:14:15Z
dc.date.available 2018-02-05T13:14:15Z
dc.date.copyright 2010 en_US
dc.identifier.issn 1016-9342‎ en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10725/7026
dc.description.abstract This article examines Tayeb Salih's Season of Migration to the North as it mimics Joseph Conrad's Heart of Darkness. It looks at the North-South dynamics in terms of colonial-postcolonial asymmetrical power relations underlying these two representative literary narratives. The two novels are structured along two round trips taken by the narrators in a reverse order, yet the ensuing outcomes are quite compelling. As each of the two novels resolves itself in a self challenging manner, it also addresses a more challenging public issue. Salih's Afro-Arab, Sudanese narrative moves from the egocentric to the polyphonic, from the dominance of a monolithic culture to the subordination of convergent cultures, and back to the starting point in the Sudan. Conrad's Euro-English narrative moves from the polyphonic to the egocentric, and back to the starting point in Europe. Along the two trips, deceptively distinct at face value, personal and collective memories are invariably recalled by the narrators to interpret and elevate the difficult situations the main characters of the two novels pass through. The stress on the spatial metaphors, as the texts place themselves in historical contexts, is so crucial for the notion of intertextuality. This raises the assumption whether Salih's model of intertextuality can be read as an explicit African attempt at writing back to the West or an implicit call for a dialogue through the sympathetic medium of literature. The article examines this assumption, in particular, through analyzing the forms of mimicry used by Salih to parody Conrad's text. Emphasis is placed on examining the issue of duplicity and/or complicity between characters and narrators. This is done in terms of Freudian and Jungian interpretations of human psyche under alienation and stress. Language and linguistic discourse features are also examined as part of the narrative structure and the historical contexts shaping the flow of events in the two tales. These are looked at as linguistic devices addressing the issue of 'otherness' and therefore foregrounding the possibility of a dialogue implied by the ways Salih and Conrad orchestrate their essentially polyphonic texts en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.title Season of migration to the north and heart of darkness african mimicry of european stereotypes en_US
dc.type Article en_US
dc.description.version Published en_US
dc.author.school SAS en_US
dc.author.idnumber 199629050 en_US
dc.author.department English en_US
dc.description.embargo N/A en_US
dc.relation.journal International Research Journal of Arts and Humanities en_US
dc.journal.volume 38 en_US
dc.journal.issue 38 en_US
dc.article.pages 105-121 en_US
dc.keywords Polyphony en_US
dc.keywords Intertextuality en_US
dc.keywords Parody en_US
dc.keywords Dialogue analysis en_US
dc.keywords Literary study en_US
dc.keywords Conrad en_US
dc.keywords Salih en_US
dc.keywords Europe en_US
dc.keywords Africa en_US
dc.keywords Novel colonial en_US
dc.keywords Postcolonial en_US
dc.keywords Discourse en_US
dc.identifier.ctation El-Hussari, I. A. (2010). Season of Migration to the North and Heart of Darkness African Mimicry of European Stereotypes. International Research Journal of Arts and Humanities, 38(38), 105. en_US
dc.author.email ihousari@lau.edu.lb en_US
dc.identifier.tou http://libraries.lau.edu.lb/research/laur/terms-of-use/articles.php en_US
dc.identifier.url https://search.proquest.com/docview/1112689129?pq-origsite=gscholar en_US
dc.author.affiliation Lebanese American University en_US


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