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I love my selfie! An investigation of overt and covert narcissism to understand selfie-posting behaviors within three geographic communities

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dc.contributor.author Shane-Simpsona, Christina
dc.contributor.author Schwartz, Anna M.
dc.contributor.author Abi-Habib, Rudy
dc.contributor.author Tohme, Pia
dc.contributor.author Obeid, Rita
dc.date.accessioned 2021-01-21T20:29:06Z
dc.date.available 2021-01-21T20:29:06Z
dc.date.copyright 2020 en_US
dc.date.issued 2021-01-21
dc.identifier.issn 0747-5632 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10725/12423
dc.description.abstract What motivates selfie-posting on social media? Although several studies suggest that narcissistic traits predict online behaviors, different types of narcissism may influence specific online behaviors. In the existing literature, two types of narcissism are frequently considered, overt (externally directed) and covert (internally directed) narcissism, where overt narcissism is the better-known construct. The utility of using the broader construct of overt narcissism, as opposed to specific sub-components, is a matter of ongoing debate in the literature and little research has explored the factor structure of covert narcissism at all. The subcomponents of both types of narcissism are used to explore participants' motivations for selfie-posting, in addition to community membership (i.e. culture) and demographics. Therefore, the current study investigated whether selfie-posting could be predicted by narcissism, demographics, and community membership. Participants from the Midwest US (n = 194), Northeast US (n = 276), and the Lebanese Republic (n = 260) took an online survey. Results supported a two-component structure for covert narcissism, suggesting that this variable should be considered multidimensional in nature. Selfie-posting frequency was predicted by gender, geographic community, and grandiose narcissism. Participants who were female, from the Northeast, and reported more grandiose narcissism posted selfies more frequently. Findings suggest that selfie-posting is favored by those with more histrionic tendencies (grandiose narcissism) and that community norms, including those which shape gendered behavior, likely play a role in the active use of social media sites. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.title I love my selfie! An investigation of overt and covert narcissism to understand selfie-posting behaviors within three geographic communities en_US
dc.type Article en_US
dc.description.version Published en_US
dc.author.school SAS en_US
dc.author.idnumber 201400035 en_US
dc.author.idnumber 201503220 en_US
dc.author.department Social Sciences en_US
dc.description.embargo N/A en_US
dc.relation.journal Computers in Human Behavior en_US
dc.journal.volume 104 en_US
dc.article.pages 106158 en_US
dc.keywords Covert narcissism en_US
dc.keywords Overt narcissism en_US
dc.keywords Selfies en_US
dc.keywords Culture en_US
dc.keywords Online communities en_US
dc.keywords Gender en_US
dc.identifier.doi https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chb.2019.106158 en_US
dc.identifier.ctation Shane-Simpson, C., Schwartz, A. M., Abi-Habib, R., Tohme, P., & Obeid, R. (2020). I love my selfie! An investigation of overt and covert narcissism to understand selfie-posting behaviors within three geographic communities. Computers in Human Behavior, 104, 106158. en_US
dc.author.email rudy.abihabib@lau.edu.lb en_US
dc.author.email pia.tohme@lau.edu.lb en_US
dc.identifier.tou http://libraries.lau.edu.lb/research/laur/terms-of-use/articles.php en_US
dc.identifier.url https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S074756321930370X en_US
dc.orcid.id https://orcid.org/0000-0002-6387-0228 en_US
dc.orcid.id https://orcid.org/0000-0002-6608-832X en_US
dc.author.affiliation Lebanese American University en_US


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